Spectrum Analyzer App

with 4 Comments

Spectrum analyze screen cap

Spectrum Analyze is Red Pine Labs’ audio-analyzing app, and perhaps the best available on the Android market. With more than 50,000 downloads and a rating of 4.3 out of 5 stars, the app can be downloaded for free in the Google Play Store. Special features are available on an upgrade for just $1 USD.

Free features include a pause, peak reset, the ability to save a screenshot with a single button, and a share button.

For the extra $1 USD, the user can set high and low limits for the X and Y axis, the number of seconds per frame, and size of FFT.

Get it here:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.raspw.SpectrumAnalyze

 

 

Google needed a Privacy Policy.  It can be found here: https://redpinelabs.com/about-red-pine-labs/spectrum-analyze-privacy-policy/

 

4 Responses

  1. Karoly Kortelyesi
    | Reply

    Hi Sir,
    What does the 0dB refer to?
    Thank you!
    Karoly Kortelyesi

    • Bryce Johnson
      | Reply

      The dB in the app is a relative measurement. 0 dB would be theoretically when the the microphone input ADC is completely saturated.

      Bryce

  2. Michael Lee
    | Reply

    Good day,
    I recently downloaded your app, and found it very satisfactory. So I wanted to support it further and bought the special features.
    Anyways, I have a question about the units of measurement used in the app. I understand that decibels represent a value relative to a reference value on a logarithmic scale. But what is the reference value used in the measure? And why is the Y scale initially set between 0dB ~ -120dB? Pardon me if my questions sound naive, I have limited knowledge on the subject. Thank you in advance for answering to my question.

    • Bryce Johnson
      | Reply

      Hi Michael,
      0 dB would be theoretically when the the microphone input ADC is completely saturated. There isn’t a reference value besides that because that would need the microphones on every android device to be calibrated. So you would need to make your own reference. If you measure a pitch with a known dB(SPL) then you could reference off of that. Or you can tell the difference between two pitches currently being heard.
      Bryce

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